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The Hallway health campaign aims to debunk macho stereotype “Boys Don’t Cry”

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The Hallway health campaign aims to debunk macho stereotype "Boys Don't Cry"
The Hallway health campaign aims to debunk macho stereotype "Boys Don't Cry"

 The Hallway has remade the legendary song ‘Boys Don’t Cry.’ Why? This campaign will counter social ideas that males must always put on a brave facade.

With a revamped version of The Cure’s renowned song ‘Boys Don’t Cry,’ designed by the creative firm The Hallway, an Australian campaign addresses cultural ideas that men must always be strong and avoid vulnerabilities.

The Hallway’s ‘Boys Do Cry‘ campaign is made in collaboration with The University of Melbourne’s Centre for Mental Health. Moreover, with mental fitness foundation Gotcha4Life, media, marketing, and creative social purpose organisation UnLtd and media agency Initiative.

The song’s remix intends to urge men to question stereotypical patriarchal ideals. The men call all out to everyone around them and stress the idea of communicating and speaking about emotions. Talking is not only beneficial but can mean a difference in the long run.

The societal stigma that males endure while seeking mental health help is a persistent issue. Nonetheless, many experts agree that discussing issues with a close one can help people avoid reaching rock bottom. One of the most difficult challenges for mental health promotion is eliminating the universal line “boys don’t cry.”

Why is the campaign important?

Professor Jane Pirkis and Dr Angela Nicholas of The University of Melbourne’s Centre for Mental Health led a study with a control group of males. The study is to check whether the film influences men’s chances of seeking help when they are struggling.

“We know that 75% of all suicides are by males and that one of the things that may be influencing this is the pressure society places on boys and men to be self-reliant and solve problems by themselves,” Professor Pirkis says.

“Our work is challenging some of these traditional masculine norms and looking at whether this may help to bring down the male suicide rate.”

The campaign’s centrepiece is a film directed by Tom Campbell of Good Oil. It features a choir of 30 men from all sorts of backgrounds, ethnicities, and localities.

The Hallway health campaign aims to debunk macho stereotype "Boys Don't Cry"

OOH Poster for the campaign

It’s okay to talk, and it’s okay to cry. We are humans. It’s natural to be vulnerable from time to time.

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